Staying Sane in the Age of Crazed Politics

I scream silently every day. I have struggled to compose coherent frameworks under which to discuss politics and management. The constant barrage of political dramas – which often are non-issues – hit us every day. It’s exhausting and maddening; the majority of them are based on lies, baseless claims, or twisted logic. Clearly, and sadly, if the king yells loud enough and often enough, his believers take his lies as facts.

Indeed, this was foretold by Joseph Goebbels, “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic and/or military consequences of the lie. It thus becomes vitally important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the truth is the greatest enemy of the State.” I weep silently every day; I weep that such a monster’s prophecy could be realized, and that so many of my fellow citizens choose to deny his monstrosity.

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I have taken digital reams of notes on my computer. I have attempted several drafts on various topics…and quickly abandon them because I cannot write fast enough to keep up with the latest outrage; that is, outrage on my part. Most important is that I take pride and caution in my use and choice of language. And I object vehemently that somehow adhering to professional standards is dismissed as “elitist,” and being courteous is to be a “snowflake.” Yet, there have plenty of moments where I feel torn between just blurting out my frustration and disgust and holding on my core belief of being a decent human being. While my daily private language has been horribly corrupted, I ultimately hold that without observing norms in the public discourse, we are no different from our barbaric forefathers, and not that much different from the baboons and chimpanzees with whom we share common ancestors.

Of course, I am referring to Mr. Trump, his defenders and sycophants, including Fox “news.” When opinions, let alone reporting, ignore factual information, the conversations are one-sided. When a person in a leadership position chokes off all dissent as “fake,” that person is deemed dictatorial or authoritarian. In the business world, such a leader might get away with said behavior, as long as she scores good profits…for a while. However, ultimately and eventually, there would be enough of a public outcry that the organization would have to take corrective action. With public figures, the consequences, at times, can be much quicker. Roseanne Barr’s show was cancelled for racist rants and Samantha Bee was admonished for grotesque choice of words.   Not for Mr. Trump, though.

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If Mr. Trump has one “achievement,” it is in the domain of winning applause for figurative murder, mostly from his base, not just voters but more disgustingly, most GOP officials and public figures. From the perspective that nothing Mr. Trump can say or do is ever wrong – and whoever criticizes him is absolutely wrong – Mr. Trump’s devoted followers are quintessential cult members. “ … the truth is the greatest enemy of the State.”

But, to admonish the Trump followers who occupy public offices or prominent positions in the society with, “History will not judge you kindly,” is to miss the point: These people are a-historical; they are, and choose to remain, dismissive of history as too distant and immaterial. Like followers of Mao Tse-Dong, Stalin, or Hitler, the people doing Trump’s bidding care only for the present, the opportunity to exploit power to accumulate wealth or wallow in gratification of poking their “enemies.” And presently, they feel as if their up-the-establishment is the revolution that will be recorded as such in history. Like the previous followers of dictators, these people care mostly about upsetting the apple cart; the goals of building a different apple cart are much less important, and that’s adequate excuse for promised goals that are unfulfilled or altered.

Try such approaches in the business world. Ironically, the business world in the States is enjoying some loosened regulations but also has to contend with chaotic national politics and growing hostile international environment.

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The most recent tax cut largely benefits the very rich; that’s ok, the rest get some anyway. (Even though their share of the tax cut, small to begin with, will disappear in a few years. In fact, for many, the minuscule tax relief is about to be consumed by increasing fuel prices.   But it’s the here and now that matters.) As regards immigrants being chased away or frightened into hiding, having their lives upended, the followers apparently cannot grasp the ramifications for industries that rely on immigrants. And when retail price increases hit them, they will find other targets to blame. History means nothing.

Yet, it isn’t right or sustainable to feel outraged all the time. We have to eat; we have to tidy up the house and wash dishes; we have to tend to our children or elderly parents. We still have to go to the grocery store just to get some ketchup; we still have to pay rent or mortgage. So, we oscillate between normalcy and mad sadness (per our predictable reaction at the next mass shooting).

As Dahlia Lithwick captures well our “collective madness:”

We are trapped in a kind of national collective madness, where lies are truth, truth is derided as fake news, corruption is cleansing, and cruelty is good governance. Suddenly the adults are children and the Parkland, Florida, kids are adults, and every time you think it can’t get madder, it just does. It’s a world in which the mere act of declaiming, “This isn’t normal,” or “They’re not telling the truth” is dismissed as hysteria and overreaction. Jokes can hurt feelings, but ripping children from their parents leaves no lasting moral footprint.

And this last point, ripping children from their parents as the administration’s latest immigration policy, Mr. Trump tweeted that it is Democrat’s fault.

Perhaps our collective madness is tantamount to a collective opioid crisis. We know better, but we cannot help ourselves. We kind of know we are wrong, but we cannot possibly admit our misjudgment to ourselves, let alone to others. For those of us who think we are the sane ones, how do we know that we are not the crazy ones? the ones with the addiction? or, the cult members? Against what do we ascertain reality?

In my last post, by now long ago, I mentioned that exit is often the strategy for coping with an intolerable organization, but not so for an intolerable society or country. In Ms. Lithwick’s piece, she employs a symbol from a fable by which we might learn to identify for each other the sane ones. Perhaps. But then, the next question is: how do we know that the very symbol we use for sanity check isn’t the hallmark of an echo chamber?

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In the end, I have to insist on facts, verifiable facts. Opinions based on facts have more legs to stand on, and opinions based on out-of-thin-air assertions are still hogwash. Or, BS. We don’t like political correctness? Then, let’s call bullshit “bullshit.”

I learned, from a recent New Yorker article these principles, by French “thinker and activist,” Simone Weil in her 1933 journal:  “Never react to an evil in such a way as to augment it.” And, “Refuse to be an accomplice. Don’t lie—don’t keep your eyes shut.”

So, after months of gnashing my teeth and feeling too immobilized to write for the public eye, I decided to assert my voice again.

Staying Sane and Charging Ahead.

Direct Contact: taso100@gmail.com

 

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